Posted in News

George Zimmerman Questioned by Police after Wife Reports Gun Threat

Tribune wire reports4:39 p.m. CDT, September 9, 2013
LAKE MARY, Fla. —

George Zimmerman, the Florida man who was acquitted of murder two months ago in the shooting of unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin, was questioned on Monday by police after his estranged wife called 911 saying he threatened her with a gun.

He’s just threatening all of us with his firearm
Shellie Zimmerman, who filed for divorce last week, also said her husband had punched her father in the nose and smashed her iPad. More…

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Posted in 50 Cent, Domestic Violence, Rapper, Social Media, Twitter

50 Cent, Domestic Violence and the Gucci Couch

For the past few days, social media has been all aflutter over rapper 50 Cent, and the pending domestic violence case against him.

According to news reports, Fitty and the mother of his child were arguing. She fled to the bathroom, closing the door. Enraged, he allegedly kicked in the door, and kicked her as well. As a result, he has been charged with a single count of domestic violence, and several counts of vandalism.

I don’t know if 50 Cent is guilty or innocent. His behavior in light of this incident, however, is deplorable.

As news of the charges against him hit the cyberworld, 50 instantly began making fun of the allegations on Twitter. He has posted a series of pictures of himself in various places with the captions, “I’m not in jail, I’m…” and fills in the blank with his activities at present. In one, he says, “I’m not in jail, I’m in the strip club.” Another reads, “I’m not in jail, I’m on my Gucci couch.” All are accompanied by pictures.

He later retweeted a fan’s comment, reading in part: “Your ex is stupid whore!”

At best, the rapper is innocent, and has been wrongfully accused of- and charged with- a serious crime by the mother of his child. At worst, he brutalized the mother of his child.

None of us know what really happened, or what didn’t really happen. Regardless, however, the situation is serious, and is not a joke. His refusal to stop poking fun of the judicial system; his refusal to stop laughing at and humiliating the woman who bore his child is appalling.

It sheds light on the man 50 Cent really is- or at the very least, the man he wants the rest of the world to see.

He could easily have said nothing about the charges against him, opting instead to let the system crank through those squeaky wheels of justice privately. Just as easily, he could have used this unfortunate situation as a platform to speak out against domestic violence- a terrible epidemic that plagues women the world over.

Instead, he’s laughing.

No, he’s not in jail…

… He’s shallow.

Posted in Abuse, Clay Waller, cold cases, Domestic Violence, Jacque Waller, Marriage, Missing, Murder, News, Relationships, True Crime

Exceptional Women Are Not the Exception

I’ve been closely following the case of Jacque Waller. Jacque was a woman from a town near Cape Girardeau, MO who disappeared in June of this year. Jacque had gone to her estranged husband’s house to pick up their son after a divorce hearing, and was never seen or heard from again.

The husband, Clay Waller, told authorities that the two had gotten into an argument, and that Jacque had stormed off. Her car was later found abandoned on the highway about three miles from the husband’s home, with no trace of the missing mother.

After months of denying his involvement, Clay Waller reportedly confessed to his father in federal court that he killed Jacque and dumped her body in a hole.

As yet, he has not been charged.

There is an epidemic involving the disappearance of women.

Almost daily we hear the news that another woman has vanished, only to be found brutally murdered days, weeks, months, or even years later.

Sometimes, they’re never found at all.

Too often, the last people to see these women alive are their boyfriends, fiancées, spouses or ex-lovers.

Rather than deal with the issues that come with involving themselves in a troubled or failed relationship, many men turn to murder, turn to making their “problem” disappear-  and quite literally so.

This, unfortunately, gives a whole new- and terribly morbid- meaning to the term “Til death do us part”.

The numbers certainly support the fact that domestic violence is an epidemic, with some studies listing homicide as anywhere from the second to the fifth most common cause of death among women. That said, I don’t want to get too caught up in statistics. One doesn’t need to be an expert to realize that women are being victimized by their male partners at an alarming rate.

I’d like to shift the focus from the numbers to the empowerment of women.

No one chooses to be the victim of homicide, obviously. A woman doesn’t get involved in a relationship thinking that her other half is the one who will kill her some day.

Be that as it may, many women tend to make terrible mistakes when choosing their partners.

All too often the warning signs are ignored, the writing on the wall has been scrubbed away by women who are willing to take deadly risks to be in a relationship. We are all too capable of working against ourselves, and against our best interests. Women have to stop wiping away the writing on the wall- and need to start paying attention to it.

I am in no way blaming victims of homicide or victims of domestic violence. I have experienced domestic assault first-hand and have an intimate knowledge of the pure evil that comes part and parcel with those who prey on women.

What I have learned, as part of my personal journey, is to identify the warning signs, listen to my gut, and trust my instincts.

Perhaps the most important lesson of all was to learn to love myself for who I am- not who someone else may want me to be.

I submit that learning to understand our value as women, learning to appreciate who we are as individuals, understanding that which we can contribute to the world is not just vital to our self-esteem, but is also critical to our safety and our survival.

A woman who loves and respects herself, a woman full of confidence and purpose, a woman with goals and solid plans, is less likely to be victimized.

No human deserves to be victimized by anyone, and they especially don’t deserve it at the hands of their spouses, lovers and ex-lovers. It’s true that no one, including women, can guarantee their safety in every situation, but we can be empowered, and we can make better decisions.

We can decrease the likelihood that we will find ourselves victimized, missing…

… Dead.

Once we can learn to appreciate who we are, we can make better choices involving men who do not love and respect us at least as much as we love and respect ourselves.

When it comes to dating and marriage, we need to stop thinking of ourselves as the exception, rather than the rule.

Yes, ladies, we are wonderful and unique. We have different talents and abilities, and what we bring to our relationships cannot be duplicated by any other human on this planet.

None of that, however, means we’ll be treated any differently than any other woman has ever been treated when it comes to certain men.

Some men are abusers, and it really is just that simple.

The fact that they abuse women has nothing to do with who we are- including our flaws, or our shortcomings- and has everything to do with who they are. Some men may try to convince us otherwise, but their words do not make reality.

If a potential suitor has a history of violence, the chances are good that this man is still capable of being violent. This is true regardless of all the wonderful things we may feel we can do for this suitor that all the other women in his life were unable/unwilling to do.

If a boyfriend’s temper seems a little close to the boiling point over minor issues while dating, it will get worse once married, worse still during pregnancy, and will continue escalating in the years following childbirth.

Yes, it will.

We are exceptional women- all of us- but we are being irresponsible to assume that we are the exception.

It’s time we stopped being victims.

Dedicated to Jacque Rawson Waller. My thoughts and prayers are with your children, family and friends. RIP, and know you were loved by many, near and far.